“Nietzsche, Genealogy, History” by Michel Foucault

Foucault, Michel. 1977. “Nietzsche, Genealogy, History.” In Language, counter-memory, practice: Selected essays and interviews, edited by D. F. Bouchard. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Nietzsche, Genealogy, History Genealogy is gray, meticulous, and patiently documentary. It operates on a field of entangled and confused parchments, on documents that have been scratched over and re-copied many times. On … Continue reading “Nietzsche, Genealogy, History” by Michel Foucault

Why debate is necessary and painful

Do we really need to argue this again? There is a refrain I’ve heard that pleads that we not revisit settled arguments. What those who ask this mean by “settled argument” usually involves a degree of force, since they tend to think war is able to settle arguments in some way. To these, a solution … Continue reading Why debate is necessary and painful

Public familiarity with legal system

In common law, societal expectations (eventually) determine legal expectations. The interpretation of laws and the laws themselves change to reflect changing standards in duty of care. For example, the eighteenth century conception of torture of POW’s was much more limited than it is today. More familiarly, municipalities monitor typical traffic flow and adjust the speed limit (higher … Continue reading Public familiarity with legal system

Collective deliberation as a theatre production

​Democratic deliberation is like a theatre play on repeated showing. People choose their parts in the play by adopting one of the various arguments available. Once everyone is tired of seeing the same play (hearing the same arguments be met with the same counter arguments), we make a collective decision to not reenact the play … Continue reading Collective deliberation as a theatre production

Ta-Nehisi Coates on the Riots in Baltimore

Originally posted on Feminist Philosophers:
In the Atlantic: Now, tonight, I turn on the news and I see politicians calling for young people in Baltimore to remain peaceful and “nonviolent.” These well-intended pleas strike me as the right answer to the wrong question. These well-intended pleas strike me as the right answer to the wrong…